The Herald, Sharon, Pa.

May 22, 2013

Candidates hit streets to earn write-in votes

By Melissa Klaric
Herald Staff Writer

SHARON — If you voted Tuesday in Sharon, odds are you bumped into either a write-in candidate or one of their supporters campaigning outside for your vote for city council.

There seemed to be more people outside asking voters to write them on the ballot than there were voters inside at the polls.

Bill James was the only candidate on the ballot in the primary for his and two other council seats up for election this year.

Write-in candidates will have to be among the top three finishers in the primary and attract at least 100 votes to claim a nomination.

“I’ve been all over Sharon today and it’s slow at some places,” Karen James, wife of the councilman, said outside the polls at Community Library of the Shenango Valley.

“It’s been pretty slow today,” said Steve Smith, who was working the polls at the library.

Smith, who has been working the polls for five years, said at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday that just 26 of the precinct’s 497 registered voters had turned out.

“I’d be surprised if we got 20 percent,” said Viola Sakony, who works the polls at the precinct in Keystone Blind Association on Stambaugh Avenue.

Outside his home polls there, Brett Lapcevich was looking for people to cast votes for his write-in bid for city council.

Lapcevich, a contractor, said he’d like to see taxes stay unchanged and was “excited about all the new businesses coming into town.”

Molly Corbett Bundrant, another write-in council candidate, was outside St. Joseph’s Church at her home precinct talking with voters. She said about 190 voters came there to cast ballots.

“I got roughly 53 at my home polling place. That’s half to the point that I need to be” to get on the fall ballot, said Bundrant.

“I’m pretty happy and very appreciative that my friends and neighbors came out to support me.”

Former Mayor Bob Lucas was at North Sharon Fire Hall, his home precinct, where he estimated that the voting was light at roughly 175 voters.

“I felt that people were happy that people were trying to fill slots that no one was running for,” Lucas said.

“Seemed like a lot of people were writing in because it was taking a long time for them to cast their votes.”

The total numbers of write-in votes were 400 on the Democratic ticket and 125 on the Republican.



Write-in candidates who qualify for the fall ballot will be announced June 4, according to Mercer County Elections Director Jeff Greenburg.