The Herald, Sharon, Pa.

Local News

September 14, 2013

Dem running to oust Corbett visits

SHARON — Ed Pawlowski bought breakfast for local Democrats after telling them why he deserves their backing in his bid to be governor.

The Allentown mayor started his day of campaigning Friday at Donna’s Diner in downtown Sharon.

Pawlowski began with jobs and talked his way through a list of issues that included public education, crumbling roads and bridges and ways he has raised revenues, cut debt, and reduced costs without raising property taxes in nine years.

Pawlowski never mentioned Gov. Tom Corbett by name, instead aiming his criticisms at Republicans he said have failed to solve Pennsylvania’s problems despite holding majorities in the House and Senate.

“They’ve taken us from seventh in job growth to 49th among the states,” he said. “We’re only ahead of Wyoming.”

He said Allentown, the state’s third-largest city, has attracted $1 billion in business investment during his tenure and benefited from 4,000 new jobs.

Pawlowski said economic development has lagged even as Republicans have failed to agree on how to pay for rebuilding Pennsylvania’s crumbling infrastructure.

“Mercer County  is the gateway to Pennsylvania on Interstate 80,” he said. “There’s no way it shouldn’t be a place to create new jobs.”

Pawlowski said 5,000 tons of steel being used to help rebuild his city was made in Erie. Concrete used for new construction in Allentown was made in nearby Berks County.

“We need to be aggressive in economic development,” he said. “If it means trying to steal jobs from neighboring states, I have no problem with that because they’re stealing ours. And what is the Republicans’ answer? They say they will send money for job retraining. That’s not good enough.”

Pawlowski said he led the way for Allentown to solve its $160 million underfunding of pensions by leasing its water and sewer system for 50 years to the Lehigh County Authority for $220 million. Proceeds from the deal, which preserved employees’ jobs and wages, paid off some city debt and cut its yearly pension obligation from $18 million to $3 million while also reducing the annual 5 percent increase in sewer and water rates to 3.75 percent, he said.

Pointing to Corbett’s failed effort to sell the state’s liquor stores, Pawlowski said leasing would be a better alternative.

“We could leave the system as it is and nobody has to lose a job,” he said. “We could lease it for $2 billion to $4 billion and lease it again in 10 years.”

Lease proceeds would provide money that could be spent for economic development, schools, and roads and bridges.

So far, Corbett’s perceived re-election weakness has drawn eight Democrats who want to challenge him next year.

Pawlowski said none of them have his mix of experience.

“Four of them have never run for office before,” he said. “I’m the only mayor; I’m the only one to run a government.”

His message was good enough to win the support of some local elected officials although he is the first candidate for governor to appear here.

Gene Pacsi, a Farrell councilman, said he is endorsing Pawlowski.

So is Ed Palanski, an Independent serving on Sharon council.

“I like what he has done,” Palanski said. “Knowing the kind of problems Allentown faced, I like what he has done to turn it around.”

Charles “Chaz” Rice, chairman of Mercer County Democratic Committee, said it’s too early for the local party chairman to make a choice among the field of candidates.

State Rep. Mark Longietti agreed. The 7th District representative who is also a member of the state Democratic Committee and president of its Northwest Pennsylvania Caucus of 15 counties, said the candidates for governor have been invited to a weekend meeting in Clairton with state legislators from the region.

The candidates will be trying to win support for the state party’s endorsement during its winter meeting, Longietti said.

1
Text Only
Local News
  • News briefs from April 24, 2014

    April 24, 2014

  • Bus cameras will be listening, too

    Hermitage School District is taking advantage of a recently enacted exemption to the state’s wiretap law in allowing officials to turn on the audio recording capability on school bus and vehicle video cameras.

    April 24, 2014

  • Union, city OK 4-year contract

    Hermitage’s nonuniformed employees have a new four-year contract that gives them average pay hikes of 2.5 percent a year and the opportunity to live outside the city limits, while allowing administrators more flexibility in scheduling.

    April 24, 2014

  • 2 principals to be hired

    Sharpsville Area school directors needed a shove to make a decision but the board voted Tuesday to interview candidates and hire two principals for 2014-15.

    April 24, 2014

  • Prison term upheld for sex offender

    A sex offender challenging a 4- to 8-year prison sentence for a probation violation lost an appeal of that sentence.

    April 23, 2014

  • Man, 24, must register as sex offender for life

    The Ohio man who exposed himself to Sharon girls on their way to school last fall must register as a sexual offender for the rest of his life when he gets out of jail.

    April 23, 2014

  • Man deemed predator – for now

    A former Sharon man was sent to the state prison system Tuesday for corrupting the morals of a teenage girl, but the question of whether his penalties under Megan’s Law will stand could be subject to future legal proceedings.

    April 23, 2014

  • Not even waste will be wasted

    Tom Darby admits he wishes the startup of the anaerobic digestion process at the Hermitage Water Pollution Control Plant had moved along much faster.

    April 23, 2014

  • 3rd Earth Fest draws families to Penn State

    Penn State Shenango’s Earth Fest has become a spring tradition for area residents.
    Families poured into downtown Sharon for the campus’ third annual sustainability celebration.

    April 22, 2014

  • Amish clean Shenango River Volunteers protect Shenango River

    Shenango River Watchers has spent more than a decade working to clean up the Shenango and improve recreational access to its water and banks.

    April 22, 2014 1 Photo

  • For many, recycling’s become way of life

    When Pennsylvania mandated curbside recycling for its larger municipalities in 1998 – those with more than 5,000 people – there was grumbling about government interference in the lives of everyday people.

    April 22, 2014

  • Many items can’t be thrown away

    The computer screen in front of you isn’t likely to do you much harm, at least not until it’s tossed in a landfill where the lead-filled components start to leak and eventually find their way into your drinking water, according to Jerry Zona, director of the Lawrence-Mercer County Recycling/Solid Waste department.

    April 22, 2014

  • David Sykes' solar panels Earthworks

    While touring Germany last year, David Sykes spotted solar panels resting in a residential back yard.

    April 22, 2014 1 Photo

  • Burned using Icy Hot, woman claims

    A Grove City woman has sued Chattem Inc. and Rite Aid of Pennsylvania Inc., alleging she suffered a second-degree chemical burn using one of Chattem’s Icy Hot pain relief products.

    April 21, 2014

  • Family outing Family friendly

    “We’re No. 5’’ isn’t a sports cheer you’ll hear any time soon.
    But considering the lumps the greater area has gotten over the years on economic rankings, it’s an outright victory.

    April 21, 2014 1 Photo

Featured Ads
AP Video
Sharonheraldnewspaper Facebook Page