Skip to main content

Editor's Pick

This Week's Circulars

Trending Videos

Local Events

Opinion

New Generation Podcast

You are now listening to the sounds of the New Generation. A podcast created for those who desire a new way of gaining information rather than reading a traditional newspaper. In our show we will discuss everything from sports, pop culture, politics, and local news. To stay up to date on our latest episodes every week be sure to follow us on your favorite podcast service. And don’t worry, we keep it short.

Despite a moratorium on executions, Pennsylvania’s death-penalty statute has cost taxpayers nearly a billion dollars since 1976, or more than $250 million for each execution. Even more compelling, some of the state’s roughly 150 death-row inmates are, almost certainly, innocent. In a series of occasional editorials and columns this year, The Herald is urging Gov. Tom Wolf and the Pennsylvania General Assembly to abolish this inhumane, racially unjust, and outdated law, and join 23 other states in ending capital punishment.

  • Updated

WITH secrecy and uncertainty surrounding the supply of lethal injection drugs, executions have become little more than ghastly experiments. The last one came three weeks ago, when the state of Oklahoma executed John Marion Grant, 60, for the murder of a prison cafeteria worker.

Premium Text Ads

Stocks

National News

Police say a gunman on a rooftop opened fire on an Independence Day parade in suburban Chicago, killing at least six people, wounding at least 30 and sending hundreds of marchers, parents with strollers and children on bicycles fleeing in terror. Authorities said 22-year-old Robert E. Crimo III was named as a person of interest in the shooting and was taken into police custody Monday evening after an hourslong manhunt. The July 4 shooting was just the latest to shatter the rituals of American life. Schools, churches, grocery stores and now community parades have all become killing grounds in recent months.

The advice of a friend to stay near the door of a semi-trailer may have saved Yenifer Yulisa Cardona Tomás from the deadly end that 53 other migrants met when the truck was abandoned on the outskirts of San Antonio. It was already hot on June 27 when the 20-year-old from Guatemala’s capital stepped out of the warehouse on the Texas side of the Mexico border where she had been waiting and climbed into the back of the trailer. Cardona Tomás was near the door hours later when she lost consciousness. She awakened in a San Antonio hospital.

Frankfurter-munching phenom Joey “Jaws” Chestnut has gobbled his way to a 15th win at the Nathan’s Famous Fourth of July hot dog eating contest. Chestnut powered down 63 hot dogs and buns in 10 minutes Monday at the annual exhibition of excess. Women's record-holder Miki Sudo took the women’s title after skipping last year’s frank fest because she was pregnant. Sudo downed 40 wieners and buns in 10 minutes to notch her eighth victory. A spectator wearing a Darth Vader mask momentarily disrupted the competition by rushing the stage. Chestnut put the protester in a brief chokehold before contest officials escorted the intruder away.

A member of the House Jan. 6 committee says more witnesses are coming forward with new details on the Capitol insurrection following former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson’s devastating testimony last week against former President Donald Trump. Illinois Republican congressman Adam Kinzinger says “there will be way more information" in two public hearings this month and to “stay tuned,” because people are emerging “every day.” Hutchinson testified that Trump wanted to join an angry mob of his supporters who marched to the Capitol, where they rioted. Hutchinson also said then-White House counsel Pat Cipollone was concerned Trump would face criminal charges if the Republican then-president joined them.

The number of U.S. flights being canceled is slowing down, but plenty of travelers are facing long delays as they try to get home from trips over the July Fourth holiday weekend. By late Monday afternoon on the East Coast, more than 2,200 U.S. flights had been delayed and more than 200 were canceled, according to FlightAware. The good news is, that's fewer delays and cancellations than we've seen in recent days. Industry experts say airlines are struggling because demand for travel has recovered from the bottom of the pandemic faster than anyone expected. That's causing airports to be almost as crowded as they were in 2019, before the pandemic.

Companies that want to sell shampoo bottles, food products and other items wrapped in plastic in California will have to cut down their use of the material. That's under a bill signed Thursday by Gov. Gavin Newsom that sets the nation's most stringent plastics reduction rules. It would require producers to use 25% less plastic for single-use products 2032. That could be met through using less material, switching to another type of packaging or making the products refillable or reusable. It was negotiated by lawmakers, environmental and business groups. Backers of a similar ballot measure have removed their initiative from the November ballot.

Demand for record albums continues to soar in the United States, and the manufacturing base is having to reinvent itself to meet demand. The Recording Industry Association of America says record album sales grew a whopping 61% last year — and reached $1 billion for the first time since the 1980s. Dozens of record-pressing factories have been built to try to meet demand in North America — and it’s still not enough. Industry officials said they don't know the ceiling for albums because of supply constraints. There are now about 40 plants in the U.S. — most of them smaller operations — and backlogs of six to eight months remain.