Paul Manafort

Paul Manafort, 70, President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, who was sentenced in March to a total of more than seven years behind bars for fraud and conspiracy charges, is being housed at FCI Loretto. According to the Federal Bureau of Prisons, his release date is listed as Dec. 25, 2024.

President Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, who was sentenced in March to a total of more than seven years behind bars for fraud and conspiracy charges, is being housed at a federal facility in Cambria County.

According to the Federal Bureau of Prisons, Paul Manafort, 70, is an inmate at FCI-Loretto. His release date is listed as Dec. 25, 2024.

Thomas Gubbiotti, public information officer for FCI-Loretto, confirmed Manafort is housed at the low security facility.

Manafort was previously held at the U.S. Penitentiary Canaan in northeastern Pennsylvania. Prior to that, he was housed in federal facilities in Virginia.

FCI-Loretto is a low security federal correction institution with a nearby minimum security satellite camp. It houses approximately 1,005 male inmates, according to the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

Low security facilities have double-fenced perimeters, dormitory or cubicle housing and work programs.

"The staff-to-inmate ration in these institutions is higher than in minimum security facilities," the Federal Bureau of Prisons website says.

Along with charges involving fraud, falsifying records and conspiracy, Manafort's sentence of 7.5 years includes additional counts stemming from illegal lobbying overseas, bank and tax fraud.

He also faces similar state charges.

Two of Manafort's criminal conspiracy counts were filed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

Mueller, who was tasked with investigating the possibility of Russian interference with the 2016 presidential election process, had accused Manafort of keeping millions of dollars from the U.S. government in offshore accounts and lying to banks to receive large loans.

As part of a plea, Manafort agreed to cooperate with Mueller's investigation, but Mueller's team later accused him of lying to them on multiple subjects.

At sentencing, Manafort appeared in court in a wheelchair, his attorneys testifying that he suffered from severe gout.

In April, U.S. Attorney General William Barr issued a partially redacted version of Mueller's report, showing that the investigation did not establish that Trump's campaign coordinated with the Russians.

Mueller could not conclude that Trump obstructed the investigation, but could not exonerate him, either.

In a press conference before the release, Barr said that after carefully reviewing the facts and legal theories outlined in the report, and in consultation with the Office of Legal Counsel and other Department lawyers, "the Deputy Attorney General and I concluded that the evidence developed by the Special Counsel is not sufficient to establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offense.”

​Jocelyn Brumbaugh is a reporter for the Tribune-Democrat. Follow her on Twitter @JBrumbaughTD.